gnocchi

Gnocchi

Gnocchi (/ˈn(j)ɒki/ N(Y)OK-ee/ˈnoʊki/ NOH-kee/ˈnɔː-/ NAW-;[1][2][3] Italian: [ˈɲɔkki], singular gnocco) are various thick, small, and soft dough dumplings that may be made from semolina,[4] ordinary wheat flour,[5]egg,[6] cheese,[7] potato,[8] breadcrumbs,[9] cornmeal,[10] or similar ingredients,[11][12][13] and possibly including flavourings of herbs, vegetables, cocoa, or prunes.[10] The dough for gnocchi is most often rolled out before it is cut into small pieces about the size of a wine cork.[14] The little dumplings are then pressed with a fork or a cheese grater to make ridges that can hold sauce. Alternatively, they are simply cut into little lumps.[10] Gnocchi are usually eaten as a replacement for pasta in the first course, but they can also be served as a contorno (side dish) to some main courses.[10]

Like many Italian dishes, gnocchi have considerable variation in recipes and names across different regions. For example, Lombard and Tuscan malfatti (literally poorly made) are made with ricottaflour and spinach, as well as the addition of various other herbs if required.[10][15] Tuscan gnudi distinctively contains less flour;[16]but some varieties are flour-based, like the Campanian strangulaprievete, the Apulian cavatielli, the Sardinianmalloreddus,[17] and so on.[18] Gnocchi are commonly cooked on their own in salted boiling water and then dressed with various sauces depending on the type of gnocchi and recipe used.[10] Some gnocchi can be made from pieces of cooked polenta or semolina, which are spread out to dry, and then layered with cheese and butter and finished in the oven.[10]

Gnocchi are eaten as a first course (primo piatto) as an alternative to soups (minestre) or pasta. Common accompaniments of gnocchi include melted butter with sagepesto, as well as various sauces. They are generally homemade in Italian and Italian-immigrant households. They may also be bought fresh from specialty stores. In supermarkets, industrially produced, packaged gnocchi are widely available either refrigerated, dried, or frozen.

Gnocchi can be purchased ready-made from grocery stores or they can be handmade. Their preparation is similar to pasta, as they are cooked by boiling them in water and then they are served with a sauce. If miniature gnocchi are wanted for soup, they can be made by pressing gnocchi dough through a coarse sieveor a perforated spoon.

frozen


Freezing Cloud is a Conjurations/Air Magic/Ice Magic spell which creates 8 to 10 clouds of freezing vapour around the smite-targeted tile. This spell uses “flood fill”: casting it on an open space will create a perfect 3×3 rectangle if you get 9 clouds, but using it in a corridor will spread the same 9 clouds throughout the corridor. While this spell is very powerful, potentially dealing sizable cold damage (6+(1d16 + 2d17 – 3)/3; averaging 13.83 per turn) multiple times to anything that decides to charge through, be careful not to catch yourself in it without rC+ or better.
Although you can target any tile within its range and your line of sight, be aware that you cannot target a tile that already contains a cloud of any sort. Creatures already within existing clouds will not be affected by Freezing Cloud unless they step into the icy mess you create around them. The effect can spill out of line of sight, but it will dissipate four times as fast.

bronze

Bronze Statues

Bronze is the most popular metal for cast metal sculptures; a cast bronze sculpture is often called simply a “bronze”. It can be used for statues, singly or in groups, reliefs, and small statuettes and figurines, as well as bronze elements to be fitted to other objects such as furniture. It is often gilded to give gilt-bronze or ormolu.

Common bronze alloys have the unusual and desirable property of expanding slightly just before they set, thus filling the finest details of a mould. Then, as the bronze cools, it shrinks a little, making it easier to separate from the mould.[1] Their strength and ductility (lack of brittleness) is an advantage when figures in action are to be created, especially when compared to various ceramic or stone materials (such as marble sculpture). These qualities allow the creation of extended figures, as in Jeté, or figures that have small cross sections in their support, such as the equestrian statue of Richard the Lionheart.[2]

But the value of the bronze for uses other than making statues is disadvantageous to the preservation of sculptures; few large ancient bronzes have survived, as many were melted down to make weapons or ammunition in times of war or to create new sculptures commemorating the victors, while far more stone and ceramic works have come through the centuries, even if only in fragments. As recently as 2007 several life sized bronze sculptures by John Waddell were stolen, probably due to the value of the metal after the work has been melted.[3]

Piles of Snow

Piles of Snow

Blog test about piles of snow. Yes, they’re everywhere. So much snow! In the mountains, in town, outside my house. The piles obscure the view from your car as you’re trying to pull into traffic. They hide the moose as they run through the neighborhood. They tower above my 2 year old daughter. They threaten to melt in a great torrent as it warms up this weekend. Piles of snow! Such a great winter.

Another Post with Everything In It

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A Post With Everything In It

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Quotes Time!

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